Contents
 

Native Designers of the Cloth

 

TOC Legends is the reality of He-mi-ka-las, Pamela Baker, a native artist/designer from North Vancouver, B.C. He-mi-ki-las's expression of her culture, through visual arts have found it's place in the vibrantly creative world of fashion designs and for which she has been recognized throughout North America.

TOC Legends: Touch of Culture
Native Clothing

210 Whonoak Road
North Vancouver, BC V7P 1P3
Tel: (604) 980-2443
Fax: (604) 983-2446
Web Site: toclegends.com

 TOC Legends is the reality of He-mi-ka-las, Pamela Baker, a native artist/designer from North Vancouver, B.C. He-mi-ki-las's expression of her culture, through visual arts have found it's place in the vibrantly creative world of fashion designs and for which she has been recognized throughout North America.

 

Denise Brillon.

ApparelLittle Bird custom shawls

shawl

Dorothy Grant Virtual Boutique Circular butterfly design by Dorothy Grant

Dorothy Grant Sinclair Centre Boutique

 

 


Native Influences

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NativeTech: Native American Technology and Art

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Moccasins
Moccasins
Creek / Seminole
Moccasins

in 19th Century Seminole Men`s Clothing
Rick Obermeyer ~ Editor


QUOTES

(Osceola`s) "These are made of tanned buckskin, usually smoked or dyed a light or red brown. They are made from one piece of material gathered together in a pucker on top of the foot." Goggin, 1955

(1880) "...The moccasins, also, are made of buckskin, of either a yellow or dark red colon They are made to lace high about the lower part of the leg, the lacing running from below the instep upward." MacCauley, 1889

"The brain-tanned skin, which has not been dyed, becomes very hard and stiff when wet unless it is continually worked over and kept soft by manipulation, but skins which have been prepared by tanning with mangrove bark are very little affected by rain, and make very pretty leggings and moccasins.

"It is rare that Seminoles ornament their moccasins Wit}l beads, and I have seen but two pairs of moccasins made in this manner: one I procured from Old Doctor... They were nicely ornamented with lines of beads." Cory, 1896

There are some very rare examples of beaded Seminole moccasins, but they do exist. There are two pairs displayed in the Field Museum, Chicago, the Smithsonian formerly had a pair (and a photo of those is still available), and a pair loaned by the University of Pennsylvania was displayed in the "Patchwork and Palmettos" exhibit the summer of 1990 at the Ft. Lauderdale Historical Society. In all but one example, the beadwork was done on a red or dark blue wool "saddle" which was then attached to lay over the top and sides of the moccasin. The designs were usually simple uneven zigzags in white and one or two colors of beads, especially old rose pink. There is one odd example beaded directly onto buckskin, at the Field Museum (not pictured). It may not be Seminole as identified, because other aspects of its construction are atypical.


Click on Thumbnail for Detail Photo

CREEK CHARACTERISTICS

Creek moccasins used very thin sinew or thread to close up the front seam and almost never show a toe tab. They are more likely to be worn with the tops rolled down, more likely to be beaded, and more likely to have been beaded directly onto the buckskin, instead of onto a "saddle." Creek beadwork designs are easily more elaborate than simple Seminole zigzags, and have parallels with motifs seen on Creek bandoliers.

 Native Threadsb


Making Creek / Seminole Moccasins

Bibliographic References for Creek / Seminole Moccasins

Complete Index to Articles in 19th Century Seminole Mens Clothing

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nine west

http://www.bettydavid.com

Fashion Fusion
through June 2000


Exhibit illustrates fusion of cultures in Native American, Anglo-European fashion

On Display at the Heard Museum North

A new exhibition that opened July 10 at the Heard Museum North in North Scottsdale, Fashion Fusion examines the stylistic exchange between Native and mainstream fashion throughout the past 150 years.

Using representative examples from indigenous cultures across North America, Fashion Fusion demonstrates how Native and mainstream cultures have inspired each other, according to Diana Pardue, creator of the exhibit along with the exhibit planning team members who include Marcia Berman of the Heard Museum North, as well as Jeannie Harlan, E. Daniel and Martha Albrecht and consultant Margaret Wood. The visually rich and diverse display includes articles of clothing ranging from Santa Fe resort clothing to fur parkas of Inuit origin. Augmenting the clothing display is an exceptional selection of jewelry and accessories. At the heart of the exhibition is the sharing of ideas and concepts.

"The introduction of new clothing designs, products and materials were all fascinating to Native Americans and they readily accepted them into their own basic clothing styles," says Margaret Wood, a Navajo/Seminole clothing designer, quilter and consultant on the exhibit Fashion Fusion. "But, even within each culture's wildly creative style, tribal groups tried to maintain some form of cultural identity."

Wood explains that the incorporation of materials and styles follows patterns dependent on any number of factors including geography, cultural contact, materials and, quite understandably, personal preference.

"The distinctive styles of Native clothing and accessories to some degree were dependent on the materials available," Wood says. "Some differences may have arisen from what materials were offered to them in trade, and whether or not those materials appealed aesthetically."

Wood points to the prevalence of beadwork among Plains tribes and the silk embroidery characteristic of Great Lakes cultures as examples of how materials and styles were adopted in a manner that continued to maintain distinctive styles among diverse cultures.

 

 

The importance and influence of cultural exchange between Native cultures and Anglo-Europeans is notable for the degree and speed of impact. Well-established trade routes existed prior to Anglo-European contact, however, modes of transportation and expansive distances lessened the quantity of material exchanged between cultures. With the arrival of Europeans, advanced modes of transportation and the focus on commercial enterprise caused a dramatic increase in the volume of materials exchanged, Wood notes.

The Anglo-European influence on Native style was in some cases borne out of circumstance. Wood points to the dress of Navajo women as an example. Following the Indian Wars, the Navajo people were forcibly relocated into camps in the mid-1800s. Looms became a scarcity, forcing women to adopt the velvet blouses and tiered skirts, rather than adorn themselves in the traditional blanket dresses. Although this adaptation was forced by outside influences, the change in style was still based on preference.

"People take pride in personal adornment," Wood explains. "The things that they select and choose to wear, they are extremely proud of."

Jeannie Harlan, a long-time Guild member experienced in clothing retail and a member of the planning team for Fashion Fusion, credits the adaptation of Native style by Non-Native cultures to the uniqueness and beauty of Native clothing and jewelry. Examples of the stylistic exchange can be seen throughout the late 19th and early 20th centuries. In the late 1970s, mainstream designers such as Ralph Lauren incorporated Native American-inspired designs into their clothing lines, creating what has been described as "Santa Fe Style" clothing. Plains Indian and pioneer clothing served as the inspiration for the fringed jackets and leather moccasins worn across North America and Europe in the 1960s and early 1970s - a casual look that accompanied the relaxation of the cultural mores of the time.

"There are items in this exhibit that every visitor can identify with," Wood says. "In part, this exhibit addresses the universal appeal of personal adornment that touches people. People will be able to envision the individuals who wore these clothes, more closely identifying with them."

First Nations Designers and Fashion Apparel Links:

 

http://www.bettydavid.com/

 

 

GARY OKER is a Canadian Native Fashion Designer who incorporates SYMBOLS of Native culture into his designs. The designs are inspired by earth, animals, water and air. To continue his evolutionary visions of connecting the past to the present, he searches for symbolic knowledge and applies these insights to his life's work.


Spirit Keeper Fashion and Design
First Nations Contemporary and Traditional Clothing
Box 1657

Squamish, BC V0N 3G0
Telephone: (604) 892-3842
Fax: (604) 892-3486

 

 TOC Legends is the reality of He-mi-ka-las, Pamela Baker, a native artist/designer from North Vancouver, B.C. He-mi-ki-las's expression of her culture, through visual arts have found it's place in the vibrantly creative world of fashion designs and for which she has been recognized throughout North America.

TOC Legends: Touch of Culture
Native Clothing

210 Whonoak Road
North Vancouver, BC V7P 1P3
Tel: (604) 980-2443
Fax: (604) 983-2446
Web Site: toclegends.com


 

fash1.jpg (13296 bytes)

Link Enterprises
Fashion Accessories

With West Coast Native Designs

Exquisite styles & fabrics


Nine West

Fashion Fusion
through June 2000


Exhibit illustrates fusion of cultures in Native American, Anglo-European fashion

On Display at the Heard Museum North

A new exhibition that opened July 10 at the Heard Museum North in North Scottsdale, Fashion Fusion examines the stylistic exchange between Native and mainstream fashion throughout the past 150 years.

Using representative examples from indigenous cultures across North America, Fashion Fusion demonstrates how Native and mainstream cultures have inspired each other, according to Diana Pardue, creator of the exhibit along with the exhibit planning team members who include Marcia Berman of the Heard Museum North, as well as Jeannie Harlan, E. Daniel and Martha Albrecht and consultant Margaret Wood. The visually rich and diverse display includes articles of clothing ranging from Santa Fe resort clothing to fur parkas of Inuit origin. Augmenting the clothing display is an exceptional selection of jewelry and accessories. At the heart of the exhibition is the sharing of ideas and concepts.

"The introduction of new clothing designs, products and materials were all fascinating to Native Americans and they readily accepted them into their own basic clothing styles," says Margaret Wood, a Navajo/Seminole clothing designer, quilter and consultant on the exhibit Fashion Fusion. "But, even within each culture's wildly creative style, tribal groups tried to maintain some form of cultural identity."

Wood explains that the incorporation of materials and styles follows patterns dependent on any number of factors including geography, cultural contact, materials and, quite understandably, personal preference.

"The distinctive styles of Native clothing and accessories to some degree were dependent on the materials available," Wood says. "Some differences may have arisen from what materials were offered to them in trade, and whether or not those materials appealed aesthetically."

Wood points to the prevalence of beadwork among Plains tribes and the silk embroidery characteristic of Great Lakes cultures as examples of how materials and styles were adopted in a manner that continued to maintain distinctive styles among diverse cultures.

The importance and influence of cultural exchange between Native cultures and Anglo-Europeans is notable for the degree and speed of impact. Well-established trade routes existed prior to Anglo-European contact, however, modes of transportation and expansive distances lessened the quantity of material exchanged between cultures. With the arrival of Europeans, advanced modes of transportation and the focus on commercial enterprise caused a dramatic increase in the volume of materials exchanged, Wood notes.

The Anglo-European influence on Native style was in some cases borne out of circumstance. Wood points to the dress of Navajo women as an example. Following the Indian Wars, the Navajo people were forcibly relocated into camps in the mid-1800s. Looms became a scarcity, forcing women to adopt the velvet blouses and tiered skirts, rather than adorn themselves in the traditional blanket dresses. Although this adaptation was forced by outside influences, the change in style was still based on preference.

"People take pride in personal adornment," Wood explains. "The things that they select and choose to wear, they are extremely proud of."

Jeannie Harlan, a long-time Guild member experienced in clothing retail and a member of the planning team for Fashion Fusion, credits the adaptation of Native style by Non-Native cultures to the uniqueness and beauty of Native clothing and jewelry. Examples of the stylistic exchange can be seen throughout the late 19th and early 20th centuries. In the late 1970s, mainstream designers such as Ralph Lauren incorporated Native American-inspired designs into their clothing lines, creating what has been described as "Santa Fe Style" clothing. Plains Indian and pioneer clothing served as the inspiration for the fringed jackets and leather moccasins worn across North America and Europe in the 1960s and early 1970s - a casual look that accompanied the relaxation of the cultural mores of the time.

"There are items in this exhibit that every visitor can identify with," Wood says. "In part, this exhibit addresses the universal appeal of personal adornment that touches people. People will be able to envision the individuals who wore these clothes, more closely identifying with them."

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